International

Reports: North Korea supplying arms to Russia

According to US media, sanctions have made it difficult for Moscow to supply Moscow’s military, forcing Moscow to purchase military hardware from North Korea.

Declassified intelligence obtained by the New York Times claims that Russia has purchased millions of rockets and artillery munitions from Pyongyang.

As the battle carried on, a US official predicted that Russia would be obliged to purchase more North Korean weapons.

Moscow apparently received its first shipment of new Iranian drones last week.

Since Russian President Vladimir Putin started his invasion of Ukraine in February, Iran and North Korea, both of whom are the targets of severe Western sanctions, have moved to strengthen their connections with Russia.

The government of Kim Jong-un has attributed the crisis to the US and claimed that the West is pursuing a “hegemonic agenda” that justifies Russia’s use of force.

The Donetsk and Luhansk People’s Republics, two Russian proxy statelets in eastern Ukraine, gained independence last month, and North Korea pledged to strengthen its “comradely friendship” with Moscow. According to Pyongyang official media, Vladimir Putin of Russia declared the two nations would strengthen their “comprehensive and positive bilateral relations.”

Uncertainty persists regarding the precise scope and size of the latest weapon deliveries mentioned in the article.

However, a US official told the Associated Press that Russia’s military “continues to suffer from significant supply shortages in Ukraine, due in part to export bans and sanctions” by turning to North Korea for assistance.

According to the Finnish research tank Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air, general economic sanctions haven’t significantly reduced Russia’s revenue from energy exports. According to the calculation, throughout the course of the six-month invasion, Russia made €158 billion (£136 billion) from rising fossil fuel prices, with imports from the EU making up the majority of that sum.

However, Moscow’s capacity to restock its military, in the opinion of the US and EU, has been hampered.

The first shipments of drones produced in Iran have also been sent to Russia, Biden administration officials informed US media last week.

Russian personnel may have been to Iran to acquire training on the Mohajer-6 and Shahed family of weapons, according to US intelligence officials.

However, they recently disclosed to reporters that several of the drones have been plagued by mechanical and technological issues ever since they were delivered.

Iran has publicly denied providing weaponry to either side of the conflict, but US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan claimed in July that Tehran intended to give Moscow hundreds of drones, some of which could be used in battle, for its struggle in Ukraine.

In a daily briefing on Tuesday, UK defense officials stated that due to heavy “combat casualties,” Russia was finding it difficult to keep up its supply of battlefield drones.

According to the report, “it seems likely that Russia is struggling to maintain stockpiles of UAVs, made worse by component shortages brought on by international sanctions.”

The officers said, “The scarcity of reconnaissance UAVs is probably impairing commanders’ tactical situational awareness and seriously impeding Russian operations.”

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